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Introduction
Psychology of survival
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Basic survival medicine
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Survival use of plants
Poisonous plants
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Field-expedient weapons, tools, and equipment
Clubs
Edged weapons
Other expedient weapons
Lashing and cordage
Rucksack construction
Clothing and insulation
Cooking and eating utensils
Desert survival
Tropical survival
Cold weather survival
Sea survival
Expedient water crossings
Field-expedient direction finding
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Survival in man-made hazards
  
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Home / Outdoor Survival

OUTDOOR SURVIVAL

Field-Expedient Weapons, Tools, and Equipment: Cooking and Eating Utensils

Many materials may be used to make equipment for the cooking, eating, and storing of food.

Bowls

Use wood, bone, horn, bark, or other similar material to make bowls. To make wooden bowls, use a hollowed out piece of wood that will hold your food and enough water to cook it in. Hang the wooden container over the fire and add hot rocks to the water and food. Remove the rocks as they cool and add more hot rocks until your food is cooked.

CAUTION

Do not use rocks with air pockets, such as limestone and sandstone. They may explode while heating in the fire.

You can also use this method with containers made of bark or leaves. However, these containers will burn above the waterline unless you keep them moist or keep the fire low.

A section of bamboo works very well, if you cut out a section between two sealed joints (Figure 12-11).

CAUTION

A sealed section of bamboo will explode if heated because of trapped air and water in the section.

Forks, Knives, and Spoons

Carve forks, knives, and spoons from nonresinous woods so that you do not get a wood resin aftertaste or do not taint the food. Nonresinous woods include oak, birch, and other hardwood trees.

Note: Do not use those trees that secrete a syrup or resinlike liquid on the bark or when cut.

Pots

You can make pots from turtle shells or wood. As described with bowls, using hot rocks in a hollowed out piece of wood is very effective. Bamboo is the best wood for making cooking containers.

To use turtle shells, first thoroughly boil the upper portion of the shell. Then use it to heat food and water over a flame (Figure 12-11).

Water Bottles

Make water bottles from the stomachs of larger animals. Thoroughly flush the stomach out with water, then tie off the bottom. Leave the top open, with some means of fastening it closed.


Field-expedient weapons, tools, and equipment
Clubs | Edged weapons | Other expedient weapons | Lashing and cordage | Rucksack construction | Clothing and insulation | Cooking and eating utensils

 

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